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25 powerful statues and memorials you can find around London

Statues and memorials in London are an important reminder of global historic events.

London is rich in history. In fact, it likely has more history than any other city in the world. It has thrived since the Roman times, suffered wars, terrorist attacks, diseases and huge fires. For many years it was the capital city of the world. And when it comes to trade and finance it arguably still is.

It’s also rich in political and military history. Scattered around the city are statues and monuments in honour to politicians, soldiers and wars. When you take notice of them and understand their significance they’re a sight to behold.

Below I’ve put together a list of 25 of them. There are many others but these are some of the most powerful to see.

Great Western Railway Memorial

Great Western Railway War Memorial

Unveiled in 1922, the Great Western Railway War Memorial is dedicated to the memory of the employees of the Great Western Railway who lost their lives in WW1. You can find it on platform 1 at Paddington station.

Charles James Fox

charles james fox statue

Toward the back of Bloomsbury Square you’ll find the statue of Charles James Fox. Whig statesman and all-round party animal, gambler and womaniser, Fox’s political career lasted almost four decades.

Henry Irving

Working class lad from Somerset, Irving was the first actor to receive a knighthood which transcended him to the upper echelons of society.  The Victorian era thespian can be found outside the National Portrait Gallery.

King George IV

king george iv statue

The King George IV statue is in Trafalgar Square. I’m unsure why there is a statue towards this piece of shit because by all accounts he was the worst king Britain’s had.

Major General Sir Henry Havelock

sir henry havelock

Sir Henry Havelock was a British soldier who fought in the Anglo-Burmese War, the first Afghan war and excelled as a military leader during the Indian Mutiny of 1857 where he subsequently died.

Charles I of England

Charles I statue

Just down from Trafalgar Square and towards Charing Cross you’ll find the Charles 1 equestrian statue. The cast itself was made in 1633 (almost 400 years ago!) and has moved around a little during this time.

Spencer Cavendish

Spencer cavendish statue

Spencer Cavendish was a prominent British statesman for four decades starting in the mid-1800s. He famously declined to become Prime Minister on three occasions stating the circumstances were never right.

Douglas Haig

Douglas Haig statue

Field Marshall Haig was commander during the Battle of the Somme which had the highest number of British casualties in history. Because of the sheer number of deaths his tactics have received much criticism in later years.

William Slim

william slim

Field Marshal Slim saw action in both WWI and WWII being wounded in action three times. The Bristolian was also a novelist in his spare time.

Viscount Alanbrooke

Viscount Alanbrooke statue

Field Marshall Alan Brooke (Viscount Alanbrooke) was head of the army during WWII. As well as this, he was Wiinston Churchill’s closes advisor throughout the war. When it come to warefare, Brooke was considered a master strategist. His statue was unveiled in Whitehall in 1993.

Bernard Montgomery

Bernard Montgomery statue

Bernard ‘Monty’ Montgomery was a senior British army officer who served in both WWI and WWII. Often called the ‘Spartan General’, Montgomery was known for his courage, efficiency and sometimes lack of diplomacy.

Women of World War II

women of world war II monument

The Women of World War II Monument was unveiled in 2005 and is dedicated to the work that women did during the war as the men fought. During the war, the male workforce was primarily used for the military. This meant that women became mechanics, engineers, shipbuilders, plumbers, airraid wardens etc.

Henry John Temple, 3rd Viscount Palmerston

Henry John Temple statue

Henry John Temple is likely the most powerful British Prime Minister in history. He served in the position twice and from 1830 to 1865 he dominated British foreign policy during its Empire reign. He was in favour of abolishing the slave trade and was a master of swaying public opinion. His statue is in Parliament Square.

Robert Peel

robert peel statue

Another two-time Prime Minister, Peel is considered the father of modern policing and one of the founders of the Conservative Party. His statue is in Parliament Square.

Winston Churchill

Winston Churchill statue

The man who steered Britain to victory during WWII likely needs no introduction. His statue in Parliament Square overlooks Parliament and it’s as if he’s making his way over to the House of Commons to do verbal battle with the other side.

Thomas Thornycroft’s Boudica and Her Daughters

Thomas Thornycroft's Boadicia

This statue is found on Westminster Bridge opposite Parliament and was created by Thomas Thornycroft in around 1885. According to reports it took almost thirty years to create. The statue is of Boudica who was queen of the British Celts and who lead an uprising against the Roman Empire in AD 60.

Iraq and Afghanistan memorial

iraq and afghanistan memorial

The Iraq and Afghanistan Memorial was unveiled in March 2017. It is to commemorate the 682 people killed in both countries from the period 1990 to 2015. You can find it on the grounds of the Military of Defence on Embankment Gardens.

Hugh Trenchard

Hugh Trenchard statue

Hugh Trenchard is known as the father of the Royal Airforce after helping to establish it. He was an advocate of strategic bombing and ofencive flying which are still used in warfare today. He fought in the Boer War, WWI and was involved in the training of pilots during WWII.

The Korean War Memorial

the korean war memorial

The Korean War Memorial was unveiled in 2014 pays tribute to the thousands killed in the Korean War.

Fleet Air Arm Remembrance memorial

Fleet Air Arm memorial

The Fleet Air Arm Remembrance memorial is dedicated to those that served in the Fleet Air Arm, the branch of the British Navy responsible for the operation of naval aircraft. The monument was erected in the year 2000 and it represents Greeky mythological figure, Daedalus.

Charles Portal

Charles Portal statue

Portal was Marshall of the Royal Airforce. In WWI he was a pilot and then made it to commander. In WWII he was commander in chief of Bomber Command involved in strategic bombing of German industries.

Charles G Gordon

Charles G Gordon statue

Major Charles Gordon, born in 1833 was distinguished soldier in the Crimean War and the Second Opium War. He played an important role in stopping the insurgents of the Taiping Rebellion.

Ghurka memorial

Gurkha Memorial

The Gurkha Memorial is opposite the Ministry of Defence and commemorates the Brigade of Gurkhas, the Nepalese soldiers that are part of the British Army. The Gurkhas are renowned for their courageous acts against the enemy. The memorial was unveiled in 1997.

Royal Airforce memorial

royal airforce memorial

The Royal Air Force Memorial overlooks the River Thames along Victoria Embankment. It was unveiled in 1923 and is dedicated to the casualties of the Royal Air Force in WWI. The golden gilded eagle is taken from the RAF’s badge and after 1945 further inscriptions were made to recognise the casualties of WWII.

Trafalgar Square lions

The Trafalgar Square lions

The Trafalgar Square lions guard Nelson’s column and represent the might of the British Empire after Admiral Nelson’s British fleet beat the French and Spanish fleets in the Battle of Trafalgar. The lions were sculpted by Edwin Landseer who had never seen a lion or even a picture of one so had to make to with a decaying lion corpse. That’s why it’s behind looks more like a cat’s than a lion’s.

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